AidData Working Paper Series

AidData’s working paper series contains pre-publication papers addressing the following areas: the causes and consequences of development finance; whether, when, and how data transparency and accountability initiatives lead to better decision making and improved development outcomes; and related research methods. The series is a forum where relevant papers and research findings can be disseminated more broadly to scholars, policymakers, and practitioners. Check back with us regularly as we publish new AidData working papers in the coming months. The views expressed in AidData Working Papers are those of the authors and should not be attributed to AidData or funders of AidData’s work.

Tangible Information and Citizen Empowerment Identification Cards and Food Subsidy Programs in Indonesia - Working Paper 27

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Authors: Abhijit Banerjee, Rema Hanna, Jordan Kyle, Benjamin A. Olken, Sudarno Sumarto

Description: Local officials in developing countries do not always implement programs as the central government intends, often due to corruption. Directly informing citizens about their rights may result in citizens receiving more, but whether this occurs in practice is ultimately an empirical question. In an experiment in over 550 villages, we test whether mailing cards with program information to targeted beneficiaries increases the subsidy they receive from a subsidized rice program. On net, beneficiaries received 26 percent more subsidy in card villages. Ineligible households received no less, so this represents substantially lower leakage.

Academic Citation: 
Banerjee, Abhijit, Rema Hanna, Jordan Kyle, Benjamin A. Olken, Sudarno Sumarto. 2016. Tangible Information and Citizen Empowerment Identification Cards and Food Subsidy Programs in Indonesia. AidData Working Paper #27. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

The Dragon's Curse? China, the World Bank, and Perceptions of Corruption in Tanzania - Working Paper 26

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Authors: Gina Kelly, Samuel Brazys, Johan A. Elkink

Description: The rise of China as a “non-traditional” development partner has been one of the most important phenomenon in the field over the past decade but the implications of this emergence are not yet fully understood. The lack of transparency in Chinese aid programs, coupled with an apparently uninterested stance towards the governance implications of development, lead many to wonder if Chinese engagement will contribute to or undermine development efforts, particularly those of traditional donors such as the World Bank.  This paper takes advantage of recent innovations in development aid data to investigate the spatial relationship between Chinese aid, World Bank aid and citizen perceptions corruption in Tanzania.  The paper finds a strong association between the location of a larger number of Chinese aid projects and higher perceptions of corruption.  The paper also finds evidence that the presence of a large number of Chinese aid projects may undermine the “beneficial” relationship between World Bank aid projects and perceptions of corruption.  However, both of these findings are qualified by the inability to disentangle the association with these aid projects from the association with similarly co-located natural resources, which may be an alternative driver of corruption via the “resource curse”.  

Academic Citation: 
Kelly, Gina, Samuel Brazys, and Johan A. Elkink. 2016. The Dragon's Curse? China, the World Bank, and Perceptions of Corruption in Tanzania. AidData Working Paper #26. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

What Determines Earmarked Funding to International Development Organizations? Evidence from the New Multi-Bi Aid Data - Working Paper 25

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Authors: Vera Z. Eichenauer and Bernhard Reinsberg

Description: Earmarked aid to international development organizations has quadrupled over the last two decades and now represents almost twenty percent of total aid. This paper introduces a new dataset on earmarked aid, which alternatively has been referred to as multi-bi, restricted, non-core or trust fund aid. The data makes it possible to track the rise of the new aid channel over an extended period of time and in greater detail regarding, e.g., the implementing multilateral organizations. The data include more than 100,000 earmarked projects of 23 OECD donors to 290 multilateral institutions from 1990 to 2012. We graphically illustrate the distribution and patterns of this new aid channel for all actors involved, namely donor governments and their aid-providing agencies, multilateral organizations, and recipient countries, and highlight promising avenues for further research. In a first empirical application of the data, we analyze donors’ heterogeneous use of earmarked aid, and test three lines of argument for the provision of earmarked aid: official donor motives regarding specific recipient needs, public opinion in donor countries, and ‘market-oriented’ donor economies’ use of earmarked aid to ‘bypass’ recipient countries with weak governance. We show that earmarked aid is associated with different donor- and recipient-level factors than traditional or ‘pure’ bilateral aid.

Academic Citation: 
Eichenauer, Vera Z. and Bernhard Reinsberg. 2016. What Determines Earmarked Funding to International Development Organizations? Evidence from the New Multi-Bi Aid Data. AidData Working Paper #25. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Foreign Aid and the Intensity of Violent Armed Conflict - Working Paper 24

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Authors: Daniel Strandow, Michael G. Findley, Joseph K. Young

Description: Does foreign aid increase or decrease violence during ongoing wars? Although answers to this question are almost surely found at local levels, most research on this topic is performed at much higher levels of analysis, most notably the country level. We investigate the impact of foreign aid on the intensity of violence during ongoing armed conflict at a microlevel. We examine the influence that concentrated aid funding has on political violence within war zones that are contested among combatants. Using new geographically coded data within a matching design, we find that multiple measures of funding concentration are associated with increased military fatalities, but not with civilian fatalities.

Academic Citation: 
Strandow, Daniel, Michael G. Findley, and Joseph K. Young. 2016. Foreign Aid and the Intensity of Violent Armed Conflict. AidData Working Paper #24. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Elite and Mass Support for Foreign Aid Versus Government Programs: Experimental Evidence from Uganda - Working Paper 23

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Authors: Michael G. Findley, Adam S. Harris, Helen V. Milner, Daniel Nielson

Description: Does foreign aid enable or constrain elite capture of public revenues? Building on prominent debates in the foreign aid literature, we examine whether recipient preferences are consistent with a view – called here donor control theory – that foreign donors wield substantial control over the flow of aid dollars, making elite capture more difficult and mass benefits more likely. We compare elite and mass support for foreign aid versus government spending on development projects through a survey experiment with behavioral outcomes on members of the Ugandan national parliament and a representative sample of Ugandan citizens. For two actual aid projects, we randomly assigned different funders to the projects. Significant treatment effects reveal that members of parliament support government programs over foreign aid, whereas citizens prefer aid over government. Donor control theory also implies that citizens should favor foreign aid more and elites less as their perceptions of government clientelism and corruption increase. We explore this and report on other alternative mechanisms. Effects for citizens and elites are most apparent for those perceiving significant government corruption, supporting donor control theory.

Academic Citation: 
Findley, Michael G., Adam S. Harris, Helen V. Milner, and Daniel Nielson. 2016. Elite and Mass Support for Foreign Aid Versus Government Programs: Experimental Evidence from Uganda. AidData Working Paper #23. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Indigenous Land Rights and Deforestation: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon - Working Paper 22

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Authors: Ariel BenYishay, Silke Heuser, Daniel Runfola, Rachel Trichler

Description: Concerns over the expropriation of and encroachment on indigenous communities’ lands have led to greater formalization of these communities’ rights in a number of developing countries. We study whether formalization of indigenous communities’ land rights affects the rate of deforestation in both the short and medium terms. Beginning in 1995, the Government of Brazil formalized the rights of several hundred indigenous communities whose lands cover more than 40 million hectares in the Amazon region and provided support for these rights’ enforcement. We study the program’s impacts using a long time-series of satellite-based forest cover data. Using both matched samples of treated and comparison communities and plausibly exogenous variation in the timing of formalization, we find no effect of these protections on satellite-based greenness measures. This is true even for communities that received support for surveillance and enforcement of these rights. Notably, we observe low counterfactual rates of deforestation on communities’ lands between 1982 and 2014, suggesting that indigenous land rights programs should not uniformly be justified on the basis of their forest protection, at least in the medium term.

Academic Citation: 
BenYishay, Ariel, Silke Heuser, Daniel Runfola and Rachel Trichler. 2016. Indigenous Land Rights and Deforestation: Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon. AidData Working Paper #22. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors - Working Paper 21

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Authors: Darren Hawkins, Jay Goodliffe

Description: Do foreign aid donors reward recipients for good human rights and democracy records? In contrast to previous studies, we argue that donor states are interested in reproduction, influencing recipient states to adopt domestic practices similar to their own. This theory of donor behavior produces different hypotheses than those previously tested. In particular, we expect that aid donors will reward changes in a recipient’s level of democracy or respect for human rights that bring the recipient closer to the donor. Once recipients become more similar to donors, however, donor states allocate their resources away from those similar states. This is because donors prefer to utilize scarce resources to reward recipients who are actively changing in ways that bring them closer to donors. We find that recipients who change to become more like donors receive significant increases in aid while recipients who are already similar to donors receive large decreases in aid. 

Academic Citation: 
Hawkins, Darren and Jay Goodliffe. 2016. Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors. AidData Working Paper #21. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

The Impacts of World Bank Development on Sites of High Biodiversity Importance - Working Paper 20

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Authors: Graeme M. Buchanan, Bradley C. Parks, Paul F. Donald, Brian F. O'Donnell, Daniel Runfola, John P. Swaddle, Lukasz Tracewski, and Stuart H.M. Butchart

Description: The impacts of international development projects on biodiversity are poorly documented, yet many areas of biodiversity importance are potentially affected by such efforts. We assessed the impact of World Bank development projects on sites of biodiversity significance (Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas; IBAs) using remote sensing derived forest change data and in situ monitoring data on the conservation state (conditions), pressures (threats), and responses (conservation interventions) at these sites. IBAs <10 km from World Bank project locations had a marginally lower rate of forest loss than matched IBAs > 100 km from World Bank project locations and were subjected to lower pressures than matched sites, although there were no differences in conservation state or responses underway. Despite important caveats, these results suggest that World Bank development projects do not have a negative impact on biodiversity, and in some cases might be a benefit to biodiversity. Thus, while more work is needed, our results suggest that international development projects might be compatible with nature conservation objectives if delivered with appropriate safeguards.

Academic Citation: 
Buchanan, Graeme M., Bradley C. Parks, Paul F. Donald, Brian F. O'Donnell, Daniel Runfola, John P. Swaddle, Lukasz Tracewski, and Stuart H.M. Butchart. 2016. The Impacts of World Bank Development on Sites of High Biodiversity Importance. AidData Working Paper #20. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Are "New" Donors Challenging World Bank Conditionality? - Working Paper 19

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Author: Diego Hernandez

Description: This paper investigates whether World Bank conditionality is affected by the presence of “new” donors by using panel data for 54 African countries over the 1980 to 2013 period. Empirical results indicate that the World Bank delivers loans with significantly fewer conditions to recipient countries which are assisted by China. Less stringent conditionality is also observed in better off borrowers that are in addition funded by Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates, but this effect vanishes after the start of the new millennium. In contrast, World Bank conditionality is rarely affected by aid inflows from DAC donors, and when it is, conditionality is revised upwards. These findings suggest that new donors might be perceived as an attractive financial option to which the World Bank reacts by offering credits less restrictively in order to remain competitive in the loan-giving market.

Academic Citation: 
Hernandez, Diego. 2016. Are "New" Donors Challenging World Bank Conditionality? AidData Working Paper #19. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Sub-national Perspectives on Aid Effectiveness: Impact of Aid on Health Outcomes in Uganda - Working Paper 18

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Authors: Tonny Odokonyero, Alex Ijjo, Robert Marty, Tony Muhumuza, Godfrey Owot Moses

Description: While the health sector has attracted significant foreign aid, evidence on the effectiveness of this support is mixed. By combining household panel data with a unique geographically-referenced foreign aid data, this paper uses a Difference-In-Differences approach to investigate the contribution of aid on key health outcomes in Uganda. We find that even though aid was not targeted to localities with the worst health conditions, health aid achieved an overall significant impact in reducing both disease severity and burden. However, the impact is most robust for disease burden compared to severity. In addition, we observe increased aid effectiveness if resources are channeled to locations that are closer to communities in need, given ease of access to health services. From a policy perspective, the results point to the need for development partners to better target aid to sub-nationalareas with higher disease prevalence. Moreover, aid ought to be channeled as close to intended beneficiaries as possible, thus offering additional advantage of driving the Universal Health Coverage strategy of “close to client” health system.

Academic Citation: 
Odokonyero, Tonny, Alex Ijjo, Robert Marty, Tony Muhumuza, and Godfrey Owot Moses. 2015. Sub-national Perspectives on Aid Effectiveness: Impact of Aid on Health Outcomes in Uganda. AidData Working Paper #18. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Does Foreign Aid Fuel Trust? - Working Paper 17

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Authors: Alexandra D'Onofrio and Giuseppe Maggio

Description: What are the socioeconomic effects of foreign aid in developing countries? How effective is aid in promoting social capital? The paper explores empirically these questions and it assesses the casual effect of foreign aid on trust in Uganda. Individuals living in counties that received aid exhibit higher probability to trust others with respect to those living in counties with no aid. On the intensive margin, increase in one percent in the value of aid projects disbursed induces a similar increase in the probability of trusting other people. We use also an instrumental strategy based on the enforcement of Non Governmental Organizations (Amendment) Act and we show that the link from aid to trust is robust to different estimation strategies. Finally, we find that a channel is operating through lowering inequality. We demonstrate that foreign aid has a stronger effect in counties where there is a lower level of perceived inequality.

Academic Citation: 
D'Onofrio, Alexandra and Giuseppe Maggio. 2015. Does Foreign Aid Fuel Trust? AidData Working Paper #17. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Foreign Aid, Foreign Policy, and Domestic Government Legitimacy: Experimental Evidence from Bangladesh - Working Paper 16

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Authors: Simone Dietrich, Minhaj Mahmud, Matthew S. Winters

Description: Foreign aid donors try to make themselves visible as the funders of development projects in order to improve citizen attitudes abroad. Do target populations receive these political communications in the intended fashion, and do they succeed in changing attitudes? Despite the widespread use of the practice, there exists little evidence about the effectiveness of this strategy. The authors embed an informational experiment about a U.S.-funded health project in a nationwide survey in Bangladesh. Although the authors find limited recognition of the USAID brand, explicit information about U.S. funding slightly improves general perceptions of the United States. It does not, however, change respondent’s opinions on substantive foreign policy issues. The authors also find, contrary to existing arguments that foreign aid undermines domestic government legitimacy, that the information increases confidence in local authorities. These results strengthen our understanding of the efficacy of promoting donor visibility and shed light on an important debate in the area of governance that assesses the effect of external actors on government legitimacy.

Academic Citation: 
Dietrich, Simone, Minhaj Mahmud, Matthew S. Winters. 2015. Foreign Aid, Foreign Policy, and Domestic Government Legitimacy: Experimental Evidence from Bangladesh. AidData Working Paper #16. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Apples and Dragon Fruits: The Determinants of Aid and Other Forms of State Financing from China to Africa - Working Paper 15

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Authors: Axel Dreher, Andreas Fuchs, Bradley Parks, Austin M. Strange, Michael J. Tierney

Description: Chinese “aid” is a lightning rod for criticism. Policymakers, journalists, and public intellectuals claim that Beijing is using its largesse to cement alliances with political leaders, secure access to natural resources, and create exclusive commercial opportunities for Chinese firms—all at the expense of citizens living in developing countries. The authors argue that much of the controversy about Chinese “aid” results from a failure to distinguish between China’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) and more commercially-oriented sources and types of state financing. Using a new database on China’s official financing commitments to Africa from 2000-2013, the authors find the allocation of Chinese ODA to be driven primarily by foreign policy considerations, while economic interests better explain the distribution of less concessional forms of Chinese official financing. The results suggest Beijing’s motives may not be substantially different from those shaping the allocation of Western official finance. The data and findings also address the need for better measures of an increasingly diverse set of non-Western financial activities that are neither well understood nor systematically tracked by the Western-led regime for international development finance. 

Academic Citation: 
Dreher, Axel, Andreas Fuchs, Bradley Parks, Austin M. Strange, Michael J. Tierney. 2015. Apples and Dragon Fruits: The Determinants of Aid and Other Forms of State Financing from China to Africa. AidData Working Paper #15. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Transparency and System Support in Peru - Working Paper 14

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Authors: Darren Hawkins, Lucas Brook, Ian Hansen, Neal Hoopes, Taylor Rawson

Description: The authors use a series of survey experiments conducted in Lima, Peru to investigate the effects of government transparency on attitudes regarding support for the Peruvian political system. The experiments reveal that transparency has little impact on political attitudes, unless accompanied by either one of two conditions: (1) the information is attributed to a credible third-party, or (2) the information provides a frame in which the government is associated with comparative socioeconomic wellbeing. 

Academic Citation: 
Hawkins, Darren, Lucas Brook, Ian Hansen, Neal Hoopes, and Taylor Rawson. 2015. Transparency and System Support in Peru. AidData Working Paper #14. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Does Foreign Aid Target the Poorest? - Working Paper 13

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Author: Ryan C. Briggs

Description: The author examines the extent to which foreign aid reaches people at different levels of wealth in Africa. He finds that within countries, aid disproportionatley flows to regions with more of the richest people. Aid does not favor areas with more of the poorest people. These results suggest that donors are not able to realize their preferences for a pro-poor distribution of aid and that aid is not being allocated effectively to alleviate extreme poverty. 

Update: This paper is forthcoming in International Organization.

Academic Citation: 
Briggs, Ryan C. 2015. Does Foreign Aid Target the Poorest? AidData Working Paper #13. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

'Ground-Truthing' Chinese Development Finance in Africa: Field Evidence from South Africa and Uganda - Working Paper 12

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Authors: Edwin Muchapondwa, Daniel Nielson, Bradley Parks, Austin M. Strange, and Michael J. Tierney

Description: A new methodology, Tracking Underreported Financial Flows (TUFF), leverages open-source information on development finance by non-transparent, non-Western donors. The authors create and field-test a replicable ‘ground-truthing’ methodology to verify, update, and improve open-source data with in-person interviews and site visits in Uganda and South Africa. The authors find that ground-truthing generally reveals close agreement between open-source data and answers to protocol questions from informants with official roles in the Chinese-funded projects. The findings suggest that open-source data collection, while limited in knowable ways, can provide a stronger empirical foundation for research on development finance.

Academic Citation: 
Muchapondwa, Edwin, Daniel Nielson, Bradley Parks, Austin M. Strange and Michael J. Tierney. 2015. 'Ground-Truthing' Chinese Development Finance in Africa: Field Evidence from South Africa and Uganda. AidData Working Paper #12. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Doing Harm by Doing Good the Negative Externalities of Humanitarian Aid Provision during Civil Conflict - Working Paper 11

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Authors: Reed M. Wood and Christopher Sullivan

Description: The authors investigate the potential negative externalities associated with humanitarian aid and argue that aid can create incentives for armed actors to intentionally target civilians for violence. The results of multiple statistical analyses provide strong support for the argument that humanitarian aid is associated with increased rebel violence but less support for the relationship between aid and state violence.

Academic Citation: 
Wood, Reed M. and Christopher Sullivan. 2015. Doing Harm by Doing Good? The Negative Externalities of Humanitarian Aid Provision during Civil Conflict. AidData Working Paper #11. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Do Aid Donors Specialize and Coordinate within Recipient Countries? The Case of Malawi - Working Paper 10

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Author: Peter Nunnenkamp, Albena Sotirova, Rainer Thiele

Description: Using geocoded aid data from Malawi, the authors assess whether the country's bilateral and multilateral donors have coordinated at the district and sector level. They find there is no compelling evidence for increased aid specialization after the 2005 Paris Declaration. 

Academic Citation: 
Nunnenkamp, Peter, Albena Sotirova and Rainer Thiele. 2015. Do Aid Donors Specialize and Coordinate within Recipient Countries? The Case of Malawi. AidData Working Paper #10. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Aid and Growth at the Regional Level - Working Paper 9

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Author: Axel Dreher and Steffen Lohmann

Description: The authors test whether aid affects development at the subnational level, measured as nighttime light growth. The study draws upon geocoded data on World Bank aid for 130 countries over the 2000-2011 period. The authors find significant correlations between aid and growth in second-level administrative regions but no causal effects. 

Update: An updated version of this paper has recently been published in Oxford Review of Economic Policy 31: 420-446 (2015).

Academic Citation: 
Dreher, Axel and Steffen Lohmann. 2015. Aid and Growth at the Regional Level. AidData Working Paper #9. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

A Spatial Analysis of the Effect of Foreign Aid in Conflict Areas - Working Paper 8 

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Author: Stijn van Weezel

Description: The author examines the link between aid and conflict at the sub-national level for three African countries between 1999-2008 using a unique dataset with information on local aid projects. This study does not find a strong effect of aid on conflict as the analysis provides relatively little empirical suport for a link in either positive or negative direction. 

Academic Citation: 
van Weezel, Stijn. 2015. A Spatial Analysis of the Effect of Foreign Aid in Conflict Areas. AidData Working Paper #8. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

BUILDING A STRONGER SYSTEM FOR TRACKING NUTRITION SENSITIVE SPENDING: A METHODOLOGY AND ESTIMATE OF GLOBAL SPENDING FOR NUTRITION SENSITIVE FOREIGN AID - Working Paper 7

This former AidData Working Paper is now forthcoming in the December issue of the Food and Nutrition Bulletin 

Authors: Scott B. Ickes, Rachel B. Trichler, Bradley C. Parks

Description: Understanding how and where official development assistance for nutrition is invested remains an important but complex challenge. The authors objective was to develop a methodology for classifying and tracking nutrition sensitive official development assistance and to produce estimates of the amount of nutrition sensitive aid recieved by countries with a high burden of undernutrition. Additionally, multivariate linear regression models indicate that the amount of nutrition sensitive and total nutrition ODA was significantly predicted by studeting prevalence. 

Academic Citation: Ickes SB*, Trichler R*, Parks BC. Building a Stronger System for tracking nutrition sensitive spending: a methodology and estimate of global spending for nutrition-sensitive foreign aid. Forthcoming, Food and Nutrition Bulletin, September 2015.

*Authors contributed equally
 


 

THE FOREIGN AID EFFECTIVENESS DEBATE: EVIDENCE FROM MALAWI - Working Paper 6

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Authors: Rajlakshmi De and Charles Becker

Description: Understanding the role of foreign aid in poverty alleviation is one of the central inquiries of development economics. Geocoded data from Malawi is used in combination with multiple rounds of living standards data to assess the allocation and impact of health aid, water aid, and education aid. The authors find a positive effects of health aid on decreasing disease severity and of water aid on decreasing diarrhea incidence. The research also suggests a potential positive effect of education aid on school enrollment. 

Academic Citation: 
De, Rajlakshmi and Charles Becker. 2015. The Foreign Aid Effectiveness Debate: Evidence from Malawi. AidData Working Paper #6. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

political economy of aid zambia

THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF AID ALLOCATION IN AFRICA: EVIDENCE FROM ZAMBIA - Working Paper 5

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Authors: Takaaki Masaki

Description: Bilateral and multilateral donors often comply with decisions of recipient country governments regarding specific details of development projects. Given their political interests, how do political elites influence the allocation of aid within their country? Using district-level data on aid projects during 1996-2010 in Zambia, this study finds that incumbents allocate more projects to opposition strongholds with a view to win over “weakly-opposed” voters. 

Academic Citation: 
Masaki, Takaaki. 2015. The Political Economy of Aid Allocation in Africa: Evidence from Zambia. AidData Working Paper #5. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

improving domestic institutions with international aid

AIMING AT THE WRONG TARGETS: THE DIFFICULTY OF IMPROVING DOMESTIC INSTITUTIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL AID - Working Paper 4

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Authors: Benjamin P. Buch, Mark T. Buntaine, Bradley C. Parks

Description: The authors argue that requirements to specify and monitor observable indicators of success have created strong incentives for aid-dependent countries to signal performance ot their foreign sponsors by achieving targets. In particular, aid-dependent countries are more likely to select targets that measure how public sector institutions are organized, rather than targets that measure what policy outcomes are achieved through stregthened public sector institutions. 

Note: This is the most current version of the paper. Please cite this paper instead of the previous version.

Academic Citation: 
Buch, Benjamin P., Mark T. Buntaine, Bradley C. Parks. 2015. Aiming at the Wrong Targets: The Difficulty of Improving Domestic Institutions with International Aid. AidData Working Paper #4. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

China working paper

AID ON DEMAND: AFRICAN LEADERS AND THE GEOGRAPHY OF CHINA'S FOREIGN ASSISTANCE - WORKING PAPER 3

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Authors: Axel Dreher, Andreas Fuchs, Roland Hodler, Bradley C. Parks, Paul A. Raschky, and Michael J. Tierney

Description: The authors examine whether more Chinese aid is allocated to the politcal leaders' birth regions populated by the ethnic group to which the leader belongs, controlling for objective indicators of need. The results show that the birth regions of the current political leader receive substantially larger financial flows but that leaders do not shift aid to regions populated by their own ethnicity. 

Academic Citation: 
Dreher, Axel, Andreas Fuchs, Roland Hodler, Bradley C. Parks, Paul A. Raschky and Michael J. Tierney. 2014. Aid on Demand: African Leaders and the Geography of China's Foreign Assistance. AidData Working Paper #3. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Titling Community Land

Titling Community Land to Prevent Deforestation: No Reduction in Forest Loss in Morona-Santiago, Ecuador - Working Paper 2

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Authors: Mark T. Buntaine, Stuart E. Hamilton, Marco Millones

Description: The authors investigate the effect of a donor-funded land titling and management program on forest cover in Morona-Santiago, Ecuador. To estimate the impact of community land titles and management plans, the authors match plots in program areas with similar plots outside program areas on a variety of covariates that influence forest conversion. Based on matched comparisons, the authors do not find evidence that land titling or the creation of community management plans reduced forest loss in the first five years after the program. 

Update: This paper is forthcoming in Global Environmental Change and can be viewed here.

Academic Citation: 
Buntaine, Mark T., Stuart E. Hamilton, Marco Millones. 2014. Titling Community Land to Prevent Deforestation: No Reduction in Forest Loss in Morona-Santiago, Ecudor. AidData Working Paper #2. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.


 

Leveraging Aid for Trade

Leveraging Aid for Trade Capacity in Uganda - Working Paper 1

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Authors: Alex Thomas Ijjo, Isaac Shinyekwa

Description: In recognition of international trade challenges facing least developed countries (LDCs), the World Trade Organization (WTO) launched the “Aid for Trade” (AFT) initiative in 2005 to coordinate international support for strengthening trade capacity in LDCs. Looking at the case of Uganda, the authors initially examine the role of overall Official Development Assistance (ODA) in driving Uganda’s external trade and then specifically of AFT in strengthening national trade capacity. The paper underscores persisting deficiency in Uganda’s capacity to meet internationally accepted standards and to ensure stability and consistency in export supplies.

Academic Citation: 
Ijjo, Alex Thomas and Isaac Shinyekwa. 2014. Leveraging Aid for Trade Capacity in Uganda. AidData Working Paper #1. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/aiddata-working-paper-series.