EVENT: On Wednesday, February 21st, the Center for Universal Education at Brookings and AidData will co-host a presentation and panel discussion on Toward data-driven education systems: What information do education leaders want and need?, with Samantha Custer (AidData), Elizabeth King (Brookings), Tamar Manuelyan Atinc (Brookings), Shaida Badiee (Open Data Watch), Deon Filmer (World Bank), Liesbet Steer (Education Commission), and Nathaniel Heller (Results for Development). A recording will be made available online after the event. RSVP via Brookings or follow the discussion on Twitter with the hashtag #data4education.

AidData Working Paper

Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors

Date Published

Mar 1, 2016

Authors

Darren Hawkins, Jay Goodliffe

Publisher

Citation

Hawkins, Darren and Jay Goodliffe. 2016. Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors. AidData Working Paper #21. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/working-papers.

AidData Working Paper

Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors

Date Published

Mar 1, 2016

Authors

Darren Hawkins, Jay Goodliffe

Citation

Hawkins, Darren and Jay Goodliffe. 2016. Putting Money to Mouths: Rewarding and Punishing Human Rights Behaviors. AidData Working Paper #21. Williamsburg, VA: AidData. Accessed at http://aiddata.org/working-papers.

Do foreign aid donors reward recipients for good human rights and democracy records? In contrast to previous studies, we argue that donor states are interested in reproduction, influencing recipient states to adopt domestic practices similar to their own. This theory of donor behavior produces different hypotheses than those previously tested. In particular, we expect that aid donors will reward changes in a recipient’s level of democracy or respect for human rights that bring the recipient closer to the donor. Once recipients become more similar to donors, however, donor states allocate their resources away from those similar states. This is because donors prefer to utilize scarce resources to reward recipients who are actively changing in ways that bring them closer to donors. We find that recipients who change to become more like donors receive significant increases in aid while recipients who are already similar to donors receive large decreases in aid.

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